Testing New Drugs on the World’s Poorest Patients.

Sonia Shah

February 3, 2016, 3:00PM

Carter G. Woodson Memorial Convocation.

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Sonia Shah is a science journalist and prize-winning author. Her writing on science, politics, and human rights has appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street JournalForeign AffairsScientific American and elsewhere. Shah’s drug industry exposé, The Body Hunters: Testing New Drugs on the World’s Poorest Patients, has been hailed by critics as a meticulously researched and powerful book.

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  • Foreword by John Le Carre
  • Winner, Prix Prescrire award, 2008
  • Library Journal’s Best Consumer Health Books, 2006

 

Shah’s intellectual enthusiasm and dry sense of humor recall popular science writers such as Steven Pinker and Stephen Jay Gould; her narrative strength and penchant for investigative journalism bring to mind science reporter and Flu author Gina Kolata.”  

                                      Michael Schaub, NPR

 

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Not Just a Pretty Face: The Ugly Side of the Beauty Industry.

Stacy Malkan 

January 28, 2016, 3:00PM, Phelp Stokes

A Berea College Convocation.

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About Malkan:

  • Stacy Malkan is co-founder of the national Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, which
    leads the movement to get toxic chemicals out of personal care products.
  • She exposes the toxic truth about everyday personal care products.
  • Co-sponsored with Sustainability and Environmental Studies.

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Awards For “Not Just a Pretty Face”:

  • 2010 Best of Green Award for best Fashion/Beauty Book
  • TodayShow.com: The Gift of Knowledge: Six Green Reads
  • Wall Street Journal recommendation by Kathy Gerwig, Kaiser Permanente
  • San Francisco Library Green List of Recommended Eco Reads

Stacy Malkan’s Ted Talk:

Hutchins Library and the Campus Christian Center will turn a page of The Saint John’s Bible

SJB Gold_0From campus press release:

Hutchins Library and the Campus Christian Center will turn a page of The Saint John’s Bible each day of Pope Francis’ historic visit to America.

As a symbol of Christian unity and hospitality, we will join schools, churches, libraries and hospitals in “Illuminating the Mission: 7 Days – 7 Pages”

Beginning Monday, Sept. 21, and each day of Pope Francis’s historic visit to America, Hutchins Library will join institutions across the country by turning to the same page of The Saint John’s Bible.

This simple act will be a rich symbol of Christian solidarity as the American people welcome the Holy Father. There are over 160 illuminations and 1,150 pages in the seven volumes of The Saint John’s Bible.

The Library will display the following illuminations each day.

  • Monday, Sept. 21 Creation (Genesis)
  • Tuesday, Sept. 22 Abraham and Sarah (Genesis)
  • Wednesday, Sept. 23 Ten Commandments (Exodus)
  • Thursday, Sept. 24 Peter’s Confession (Matthew)
  • Friday, Sept. 25 Multiplication of the Loaves and Fishes (Mark)
  • Saturday, Sept. 26 Two Cures (Mark)
  • Sunday, Sept. 27 Pentecost (Acts of the Apostle)

According to Saint John’s Rev. Michael Patella, OSB, who chaired the scholarship effort behind The Saint John’s Bible, “These illuminations were specifically chosen because they resonate with values Pope Francis holds dear: hospitality; concern for the poor, sick and marginalized; the dignity of all people; and care for creation.”

In addition to the illuminated pages, a reflection for each day, written by Saint John’s University School of Theology and Seminary, will also be on display.

The Saint John’s Bible is the first handwritten and illuminated Bible commissioned by a Benedictine monastery since the invention of the printing press in the 15thcentury. Saint John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota, commissioned world-renowned calligrapher

Donald Jackson, senior scribe to Her Majesty the Queen’s Crown Office at the House of Lords in London, England, to create this masterpiece. More information on The Saint John’s Bible and the Heritage Edition can be found at http://www.saintjohnsbible.org.

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The library’s display can be found by the library’s entrance, near the Reference Desk. It can be viewed during regular library hours. This exhibit is free and open to the public.

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“What the St. John’s Bible Says to You” Library Display

In continuation of “A Year With the Saint John’s Bible”…

 MARCH MINDFULNESS

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St Johns Creation image

Creation, Covenant, Shekinah, Kingdom, Donald Jackson, Copyright 2006, The Saint John’s Bible, Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota USA. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

We would like to say “Thank you” to:

 

John King

Becky Lewis

Mark Ross

and Whitney Withington

 

for sharing “What the Saint John’s Bible Says to You.”

 

Now on Display in the Library Lobby

 

What on earth are you doing on Earth Day?

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Officially kick-starting an environmental movement in 1970,  Earth Day was a product of the hippie and flower-child culture of the time. Before this movement was underway, the term “environment” was rarely mentioned in the news, discussed, or thought of as an issue. The air pollution from booming industry and automotives filled with leaded gas created a smell in the air that was accepted by Americans to be of prosperity and the American Dream, not of chemicals, sludge, and toxins.

Wisconsin Senator, Gaylord Nelson, proposed Earth Day after witnessing the devastating oil spill in Santa Barbara, California in the year of 1969. Nelson wanted to bring the idea of environmental protection into public consciousness and did so by announcing a “national teach-in on the environment”. In turn, Americans filled streets, auditoriums, everywhere protesting the unintentional deterioration of the environment on April 22nd, 1970. Today, another campaign is spreading through the country regarding clean energy and global warming. There are many ways to encourage ecologically healthy habits and Berea College does just that.

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Luckily for it’s students, Berea is an incredibly eco-friendly place to get an education. Berea was the first in Kentucky to have a LEED-certified building, to build and operate an Ecovillage, and have the most ecologically sound dormitory- Deep Green Residence Hall. Not only do our buildings prove our efforts of sustainability, but the college really attempts to help and encourage students to be as “green” as possible. Throughout campus there are multiple recycling bins, found in buildings, out of doors, and in dorms for students, faculty, and town patrons to use. Buildings contain motion sensor lighting and plumbing to eliminate excessive use of electricity and water. And all people are educated on sustainability and given many opportunities to decrease their carbon footprint. This Earth Day, however, we want to motivate you to go above and beyond.

Knowledge is power and Hutchins Library has a new mini-display up (currently in the Reference section, but will be moved next to the printers) to provide you with intelligence on any subject related to the earth- environmental law, global warming, health effects of the environment, environmental politics, environmental activists, and much more.

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Be sure to get involved with Earth Day somehow! Research it. Recycle more. Volunteer. Walk more, drive less. Eat local. Go to a festival. Practice the 7Rs (Reuse, repurpose, rot, repair, return, refill, refuse). Organize an event in the community. Change a habit. Help launch a community garden. Communicate your priorities to our elected representatives. Do something nice for the Earth, have fun, meet new people, and make a difference. But you needn’t wait for April 22! Earth Day is Every Day. Committing to the earth year round is the only way to make a huge difference.

To find books about the earth search our catalog: http://libraryguides.berea.edu/

Women’s History Month: Celebrating Women Writers

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Beginning as simply a “Women’s History Week” the week of March 7th, 1982, a celebration of women and their accomplishments and contributions developed over 5 years into an annually declared “Women’s History Month” that we honor today. It is a time of the year where women are acknowledged for their political, social, economical, and cultural impacts that may be overlooked in other months. The story of America is one involving every gender, race, and social class. From Sacagawea to Joan of Arc to Susan B Anthony to Florence Nightingale to Harriet Tubman to Annie Oakley to Marie Curie to Georgia O’Keefe to Mother Theresa to Gloria Steinem to Vera Wang to Oprah Winfrey, women from every nook and cranny of the world have been leaders, innovators, challengers to social norms, and more.

This month is not just for the suffragists, the angry feminists who set their undergarments ablaze, the first female politicians to take a particular office, or the pioneering women figures who resisted the patriarch by choosing career paths in typically male-centric fields. This month is just as much for those women whose part in history was to care for men in battle, to raise their children to be upstanding human beings, and to explore the depths of culture through art, music, theatre, and literature. All of these things have had and will continue to have radical impacts on our society today.

Within the library, located by the vending machines, is a display put together of novels written by women authors. While normally seen as just an entertaining pastime, some of these writers have helped question social morality issues and change the world of writing as a whole. Women have been writing since some of the earliest parts of history; for example, Sappho, an Ancient Greek female poet, and Hildegard of Bingen, a medieval mystic and author in a convent.

Then there are early modern authors like Jane Austen whose work combined romantic novels with social realism; Harriet Beecher Stowe, the author of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, that openly supported the anti-slavery campaign; Emily Dickinson whose poetry influences modern poetics to this day; Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein, who invented the literary genre of science fiction at the young age of 21 years old; Anne Frank whose use of a diary enlightened the world to the reality of hiding from the Gestapo; and Maya Angelou who was one of the first African American women to publicly discuss her personal life in her own published writing.

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In today’s culture, readers can become immersed in popular culture reading such as the Harry Potter series by JK Rowling, Suzanne Collins’s The Hunger Games trilogy, S.E. Hinton’s The Outsiders, Lois Lowry’s The Giver, and Sarah Dessen’s numerous YA love stories. Or they can choose to read books to help bring about social change such as Jodi Picoult’s novels that question our judicial system and bring LGBT issues into the spotlight; Kathryn Stockett’s The Help that exposed the trials African American women had to overcome during the Civil Rights Movement period; and Roxane Gay’s Bad Feminist that contains a series of essays on how she is an imperfect supporter of equality between the genders and how that’s okay.

In recent literary anthologies, 1 female writer is included for every 6 male writers. Reading women writers’ work is useful for everyone, not just to support them, but to understand how women characters in their books and poems actually tell the real story of what it means to be a woman. These characters can directly interact with the reality of womanhood, are simply smart and capable women like Katniss Everdeen, Hermione Granger, and Jo March, or reveal that women are flawed human beings through characters like Amazing Amy in Gone Girl who proves that likable women choose not to always do the right thing. Women writers, past and present, are able to provide readers with dynamic, three-dimensional, and true female characters that can influence how women are depicted in any form of writing by any gender. Of course, female authors are not limited to challenging the gender definitions, but can make other significant contributions too like pushing the limits of narrative as Virginia Woolf does with her nonlinear approach. More and more women have become storytellers, poets and prophets, the authors of dreams and ideas–the voices to whom we listen. Female authors are important simply because women’s voices are integral to the human experience.

This month we commemorate and revere the works of all women writer’s across the span of time. Women have been granted the right to an education, gained the right to vote, entered into the world of sports, served as heads of state, made important scientific discoveries, taken to the skies, outnumbered men in college, and changed the world through their literary voice. All women from each of these categories and others are threads that make up an intricate pattern of history for the world. Be sure to check out the display to find out for yourself.

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Links:

BANC (Library Catlogue) to search for books by or about women writers: http://libraryguides.berea.edu/

For more information about Women’s History Month:

Art History

The next time you are in Hutchins Library, check out the new Art History display, located in the study area to the right of the printers in the Reference Area.

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Reference Student Abby Houston curated this display to share her major as well as to help students know where to find high quality images within our library and online databases.

A lot can be learned by studying art from the past. Art doesn’t just provide us with aesthetic pleasure, but it clues us into the culture that produced it. By studying its materials, iconography, color, symbolism, function, style, and technique, we can expand our knowledge of that culture and learn what role a certain piece of art held within it. Art has been around since the beginning of time and is something that connects all cultures from every time period, even today.

“By looking at what has been done before, we gather knowledge and inspiration that contribute to how we speak, feel, and view the world around us.” – the Metropolitan Museum

This display shows 20 books filled with images and information that can be found in the collection of our library. Some of the books shown above are about: Impressionism, African art, Italian Renaissance art, Pablo Picasso, Celtic art, German Expressionism, Roman art, Egyptian art, Modern Chinese art, and others. Feel free to scan through their pages and experience a wide range of art- you can even check them out!

Whether your major or minor is in art, you simply have an interest in it, you need an image for your paper, or you need to kill some time, this display lays out the kind of resources Hutchins Library has to offer. In the circulating print collection upstairs, there are thousands of books about different art movements, artists, and time periods that all contain high-resolution images you can flip through and look at or scan onto a flash drive to use for your own research. In our A-Z electronic sources list is a database titled “ARTstor” that is dedicated only to images of artworks; ranging from Michelangelo’s David to King Tut’s mask to Japanese prints. To access these images, you type in an artist or title and search.

Check out these art books by searching in our library catalog: http://libraryguides.berea.edu/

Explore ARTstor: http://www.artstor.org/index.shtml

If you’re off campus, use this link and log in with your Berea username and password: http://libraryguides.berea.edu/ARTStor

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