Testing New Drugs on the World’s Poorest Patients.

Sonia Shah

February 3, 2016, 3:00PM

Carter G. Woodson Memorial Convocation.

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Sonia Shah is a science journalist and prize-winning author. Her writing on science, politics, and human rights has appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street JournalForeign AffairsScientific American and elsewhere. Shah’s drug industry exposé, The Body Hunters: Testing New Drugs on the World’s Poorest Patients, has been hailed by critics as a meticulously researched and powerful book.

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  • Foreword by John Le Carre
  • Winner, Prix Prescrire award, 2008
  • Library Journal’s Best Consumer Health Books, 2006

 

Shah’s intellectual enthusiasm and dry sense of humor recall popular science writers such as Steven Pinker and Stephen Jay Gould; her narrative strength and penchant for investigative journalism bring to mind science reporter and Flu author Gina Kolata.”  

                                      Michael Schaub, NPR

 

Not Just a Pretty Face: The Ugly Side of the Beauty Industry.

Stacy Malkan 

January 28, 2016, 3:00PM, Phelp Stokes

A Berea College Convocation.

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About Malkan:

  • Stacy Malkan is co-founder of the national Campaign for Safe Cosmetics, which
    leads the movement to get toxic chemicals out of personal care products.
  • She exposes the toxic truth about everyday personal care products.
  • Co-sponsored with Sustainability and Environmental Studies.

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Awards For “Not Just a Pretty Face”:

  • 2010 Best of Green Award for best Fashion/Beauty Book
  • TodayShow.com: The Gift of Knowledge: Six Green Reads
  • Wall Street Journal recommendation by Kathy Gerwig, Kaiser Permanente
  • San Francisco Library Green List of Recommended Eco Reads

Stacy Malkan’s Ted Talk:

Come to campus and de-stress with a gentle dog

Therapy dogs visit campus flyer

Come relax and de-stress with a gentle four-legged friend. Therapy dogs will be visiting Berea College on Friday December 11th, 2015. The dogs will be here from 10:00am to 12 noon and 1:00pm to 3:00pm.

You can visit with the dogs at these locations:

  • Hutchins Library‘s basement.
  • The Fireside Room in Draper Hall.
  • The V-12 Lounge in the Alumni Building.
  • The CPO area in Woods-Penn Building.

The event is sponsored by the Campus Christian Center.

Come Spend a Year with the St. John’s Bible

St. John's Bible Display September 24, 2014

Our display of the St. John’s Bible at the library is almost ready to go.

As you walk into Hutchins Library, you may have noticed work on a new display. There is a new wooden display case as you walk in. Banners are up now. The library is preparing to display Volume 6, “Gospels and Acts” of the Heritage Edition of the St. John’s Bible.

What is the St. John’s Bible?

In 1998, Saint John’s Abbey and University commissioned renowned calligrapher Donald Jackson to produce a handwritten, hand-illuminated Bible. This is an effort that has not been done in almost 500 years. However, it is not just the divine word or a work of art. It is also a work that dares to ask some very modern questions:

  • What if the Bible clearly depicts Adam and Eve, the first humans, as East African?
  • What if the views of Earth from space are borrowed from NASA’s Hubble Telescope?
  • What if the great religions of the world, in addition to Christianity, are referenced wherever possible?

Come explore the answers to those questions and more as you view and spend time with the St. John’s Bible at Hutchins Library.

The Event Details:

The event opens with a public showing at campus convocation on Thursday, September 25, 2014 at 3:00pm in Phelps-Stokes Chapel. The convocation features Tim Ternes speaking on “More Work Than We Knew, More Joy Than We Imagined.” He will describe the 13 year process of creating the first Biblical manuscript commissioned in more than 500 years. After September 25, the display will continue at Hutchins Library until May 15, 2015.

In addition to the display, the library and the college will host a variety of programs related to the St. John’s Bible throughout the campus and the community. Check out the activities calendar for details. Also, Hutchins Library Special Collections and Archives will feature an exhibit of other rare manuscripts, early printed Bibles, and sacred texts from the college’s collection.

An Event Open To All:

The Bible is a work with fans and detractors. Some see it as the Word of God. Others may see it as a great work of literature and storytelling. Others yet may see it as words often misused and misrepresented, a work partly responsible for historic challenges including slavery, conflict and war, and enabling human exploitation of the planet and other people. Whatever your view, this is an exhibit for all, religious and non-religious. Join us and come see what the St. John’s Bible has to say to you.

The convocation on September 25, 2014 is free and open to the public.

The display at Hutchins Library can be viewed during the library’s regular hours.

“A Year with the St. John’s Bible” at Berea College is made possible through a partnership between Hutchins Library and the Campus Christian Center. with support from the Art, General Studies, History, and Religion programs.

Sources for additional information:

Lunch at the Library: Square Dancing in the Kentucky Foothills

News from Special Collections and Archives. Posting by Harry Rice, Sound Archivist:

When: Thursday, June 26, 2014.

Time: 11:45am to 1:00pm

Location: Library Room 106

Appalachian Sound Archives Fellowship scholar Susan Spalding will share what she has learned from her work documenting mid-1900s square dancing and clogging/flatfooting traditions in Berea and surrounding areas during that were distinct from the college’s traditional music and dance programs.

The picture that has emerged from her study in the Archives and interviews with local individuals is one of a thriving complex of community and home based dance activity that among other things included area dancers performing at Renfro Valley in the 1940s, children’s square dance teams in the 1950s, and street dances at the Berea Home-Coming during the 1950s and 1960s. Intermixed with these accounts are stories from Berea and other communities such as Estill County, about parades, music on the porch, family gatherings, honky-tonks, and long horseback rides over the mountain for a square dance.

Susan was a member of the Berea College Department of Physical Education and Health for fifteen years, and directed Dance Programs and Country Dancers.  She has been dancing in the Appalachian region for almost three decades, and has served as a consultant for the Smithsonian Festival of American Folklife and the Kentucky Folklife Festival. She co-edited the book Communities in Motion: Dance, Tradition and Community, edited the dance entries for the Encyclopedia of Appalachia, and co-produced two Appalshop video documentaries on old-time dance. Her book Appalachian Dance: Creativity and Continuity in Six Communities is forthcoming from University of Illinois Press.