Chapman’s The Helmet Project on display at library and other campus locations

You may have noticed a set of paintings to the right side of the reference desk when you visit the library. They are the work of Berea alumnus Gary Chapman, ’84, and the paintings are part of a campus-wide exhibit. The exhibit features 12 paintings from The HELMET Project that are placed strategically in six buildings around campus: Danforth Industrial Arts, Draper Building, Frost Building, Hutchins Library, Lincoln Hall, and Seabury Center. The exhibition is the first time these paintings have been exhibited outside of a gallery. In addition, you can visit the Doris Ulmann Galleries in the Roger-Traylor Art Building and view photos of the paintings in other unexpected places.

The exhibit runs from August 24th to September 26.

If you would like to learn more, the library has copies of the artist statement and other materials you can take. In addition, you can watch the video below where the artist speaks of his work.  You can also visit his official website at this link: http://garychapmanart.com/.

The HELMET Project from High 5 Productions on Vimeo.

Need some reading ideas? Here are some recent award winners

Are you looking for some ideas of what to read this summer? Here are some links and information on recent literary award winners. Lists often feature both the final winners and other nominees, so there are plenty of choices for reading.

  • Would you like to read some horror? Want some chills and thrills? The Bram Stoker Awards for 2013 have been announced by the Horror Writers Association.
  • How about some mystery? You can check out the Mystery Writers of America’s 2014 winners list of the Edgar Awards.
  • Maybe you like your mysteries a bit more cozy? In the tradition of Agatha Christie, the Agatha Awards list for 2013 is available. Unlike the Edgars, the Agathas are very specific in their criteria for an award. Agathas go to books that “contain no explicit sex” and “contain no excessive gore or gratuitous violence.” If you wanted a hard boiled mystery, for example, you would want to see the Edgars list.
  • June is LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transexual) Pride Month. If you would like to read some LGBT literature, the Lambda Literary Awards for 2014 list is out from the Lambda Literary Foundation. Among the honorees is Alison Bechdel, author of Fun Home.
  • Looking for science fiction and fantasy? The Nebulas for 2013 are out. The Nebulas are voted on by active members of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.

If you find a title you like, you can check BANC (the library catalog) to see if we have it. If you need help finding a book or using BANC, you are welcome to visit the reference desk or contact us.

Lunch at the Library: Square Dancing in the Kentucky Foothills

News from Special Collections and Archives. Posting by Harry Rice, Sound Archivist:

When: Thursday, June 26, 2014.

Time: 11:45am to 1:00pm

Location: Library Room 106

Appalachian Sound Archives Fellowship scholar Susan Spalding will share what she has learned from her work documenting mid-1900s square dancing and clogging/flatfooting traditions in Berea and surrounding areas during that were distinct from the college’s traditional music and dance programs.

The picture that has emerged from her study in the Archives and interviews with local individuals is one of a thriving complex of community and home based dance activity that among other things included area dancers performing at Renfro Valley in the 1940s, children’s square dance teams in the 1950s, and street dances at the Berea Home-Coming during the 1950s and 1960s. Intermixed with these accounts are stories from Berea and other communities such as Estill County, about parades, music on the porch, family gatherings, honky-tonks, and long horseback rides over the mountain for a square dance.

Susan was a member of the Berea College Department of Physical Education and Health for fifteen years, and directed Dance Programs and Country Dancers.  She has been dancing in the Appalachian region for almost three decades, and has served as a consultant for the Smithsonian Festival of American Folklife and the Kentucky Folklife Festival. She co-edited the book Communities in Motion: Dance, Tradition and Community, edited the dance entries for the Encyclopedia of Appalachia, and co-produced two Appalshop video documentaries on old-time dance. Her book Appalachian Dance: Creativity and Continuity in Six Communities is forthcoming from University of Illinois Press.

New Oral History Collections Added to Our Online Catalog

News from the folks at Special Collections and Archives:

Two new oral history collections have been added to our online catalog:
Appalachian Foodways Oral History Collection, SAA 164
http://banc.berea.edu:7008/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=657763
This collection consists of audio recordings and typed transcripts of interviews recorded during the summer of 2012 by then Berea College students Katie Bills and Chelsea Bicknell as part of a foodways internship project with Berea faculty member Margaret Dotson. Foodways is the study of the interactions among food, culture, environment, and history. Twenty seven persons were interviewed for the purpose of documenting foodways in Pleasants County, West Virginia and Estill County, Kentucky. Interviewees were mostly in their 70s. A few were 90 years old or older. The interviews provide first-hand accounts of how foodways in two widely separated areas of the Appalachian region have developed and changed over the last 60 to 85 plus years. Specific subject areas described include gardening, farming, preparing food, preserving food, eating habits and preferences, and food related traditions.

Berea College Campus Ministry Oral History Collection, RG 14.14
http://banc.berea.edu:7008/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=657785
These interviews trace the development of religious life activities and programs at Berea College especially in relationship to the establishment of the position of Campus Minister and the Campus Christian Center. The memory time span of the interviewees ranges from 1930 through 1988, the time of the then most recent interview. The collection consists of audio recordings and typed transcripts of seven interviews recorded by Berea College Campus Minister Lee Morris. Five were recorded during the summer of 1983. Two additional were recorded in 1987 and 1988 respectively.

We Have Zines!

The next time you are in Hutchins Library, you should stop by the periodicals section (near Circulation) and check out the zines currently residing at the end of our magazine/journal shelving.

What are zines? According to the St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture:

zines are nonprofessional, anti-commercial, small-circulation magazines produced, published, and distributed by their creators themselves. Composed and formatted on home computers, zines are reproduced on copiers or printers, assembled on kitchen tables, and sold or swapped through the mail or made available at small book or music stores. It is estimated that between 10,000 and 20,000 zines circulate in the United States and in other countries throughout the world. With names like Dishwasher, Temp Slave, Pathetic Life, Practical Anarchy, Punk Planet, and Slug & Lettuce, zines have a subject matter that ranges from the sublime to the ridiculous and sometimes the unfathomable. What binds these publications together is the prime directive “do-it-yourself.” Zines advocate that people stop shopping for culture and create their own (Duncombe 489).

To pique your interest, here is a sampling of just a few of the titles currently on display:

zine 4zine 3 zine 2 zine 1Our zines are not cataloged, so you won’t be able to search for them in BANC. Also, they are not a permanent part of our library collection. What does that mean to you? It means you need to come and enjoy them now, while they are here. Give yourself some time to browse the titles and be prepared to be shocked, educated, or entertained (or all three at once!)

Source:

Duncombe, Stephen. “Zines.” St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture. Ed. Thomas Riggs. 2nd ed. Vol. 5. Detroit: St. James Press, 2013. 489-490. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 7 Apr. 2014.

 

Reference Book of the Week: Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature

March is Women’s History Month, so we continue highlighting some reference items related to women and women’s studies on the blog this month. This week we are looking at the Encyclopedia of Feminist Literature. This is an A to Z guide to feminist literature. Entries cover important feminist writers such as Aphra Behn, Jane Austen, Anaïs Nin, Sandra Cisnerors, and more much more. It also covers influential works, literary theories, motifs, issues, philosophical and literary developments, sources, women’s history, literary history, genres, themes, characters, and literary conventions.

The work is arranged in more than 500 entries in alphabetical order. It draws on the expertise of a diverse group of scholars. In addition, topics are drawn from “a close examination of the syllabi of women’s studies, literature, and social issues classes, as well as the contents of current textbooks, supplemental reading lists, and notable projects and seminars that have drawn together teachers, students, writers, activists, and authorities on feminist concerns” (vii).

Each entry includes a short bibliography for further reading. Entries also include cross-references (indicated by names in full caps in an entry). In addition to the entries, the volume also features:

  • An introductory essay for the volume that provides an overview of feminist literature and writers.
  • A list of authors by genre. For example, get a list of feminist writers who write drama.
  • A list of major feminist authors and their works.
  • A timeline of major works in feminist literature.
  • A primary sources bibliography listing print works and electronic texts.
  • A secondary sources bibliography for works about the writers and feminist literature.
  • A small list of relevant films.
  • An index, where boldfaced terms indicate main entries.

For students in literary studies, classes with literature elements, and WGS (women and gender studies), this can be a volume of interest. Whether you need to find a specific term or idea, such as “letter writing,” look up an author like Amy Tan, or get a quick overview of a work, say Life in the Iron Mills, this is the book for you. If you are starting to do research on feminist literature, fiction or nonfiction, this is book is an excellent starting point.

You can find it in the library’s Second Floor Reference Collection under the call number R 809.892 S673e 2006.

 

Reference Book of the Week: Women in Developing Countries

March is Women’s History Month, so I am highlighting some reference items related to women and women’s studies on the blog. This week I am featuring Women in Developing Countries: A Reference Handbook (link to library catalog). This is part of ABC-CLIO’s Contemporary World Issues series. The books in this series are designed, according to the publisher, to provide accurate, unbiased information on major topics. Books in this series are designed to be good research starting points for students, scholars, general readers, activists, legislators, and others.

“The purpose of the book is to provide a survey of the literature and other resources on the topic of women in developing countries and to provide sources for further research” (xv).

The book is arranged as follows:

  • Preface gives readers a brief description of the book’s scope and content.
  • The book includes a lists of developing countries; this helps define the book’s scope.
  • Chapter 1 provides background and historical information. Basic concepts are defined and discussed. We get a look at women’s status and experiences around the world, in a broad way, covering topics such as education, health care, and employment.
  • Chapter 2 goes over important specific issues and controversies.
  • Chapter 3 focuses on issues of concern in the United States.
  • Chapter 4 provides a chronology of key events in recent history of women in developing countries.
  • Chapter 5 offers a set of biographical sketches. These are short biographies of women who have played major roles in areas related to the subject ranging from politics to social activism and from local and international figures.
  • Chapter 6 is the statistics and data chapter. It also includes some texts and summaries of relevant U.N. conventions.
  • Chapter 7 is a listing of organizations, mostly NGO’s, government agencies, and government-affiliated organizations.
  • Note that Chapters 1-6 do include a list of references, which researchers can find useful for further reading.
  • Chapter 8 is an annotated bibliography of books and other materials related to women in developing countries.
  • There is also a glossary of terms, and the book includes an alphabetical index.

Students doing research on women’s issues, in the U.S. and abroad, with an interest in developing countries will find the book useful. The book provides an overview of topics, and it helps the reader find ways to expand research. In addition, as other reference books do, this book provides vocabulary, which can be used then in article database searching. Finally, students can use the bibliography to find additional sources of information. This is overall a nice volume that packs a lot of value and information for the researcher needing a starting point on this topic.

The book is located in the 2nd Floor Reference Collection of the library under call number 305.409 K557w 2011.