Library Display: Feminist Artists of Kentucky Art Exhibit

Banner and Quilt, part of Feminist Artists of KY Display

Banner and Quilt, part of Feminist Artists of KY Display

The Feminist Artists of Kentucky Art Exhibit is on display at Hutchins Library through the month of February 2016. These working artists combine their efforts and talents to expand their creativity and create exhibitions that challenge the social norms. The artists support gender parity and equality in the art world.

The Feminist Artists of Kentucky are:

  • Trish Ayers
  • Pat Cheshire Jennings
  • Jackie Pullum
  • Mary Ann Shupe
  • Patricia Watkins
  • Valeria Watkins
  • And guest artist Lynn Marrapodi.

If you wish to purchase any of the art pieces available for purchase, you may call 859-302-3709.

The exhibit can be viewed in the main floor of Hutchins Library during regular library hours.

This exhibit is free and open to the public.

Flower selection Feminist Artists KY Display_20160216

Paintings of flowers, part of Feminist Artists of KY display

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Library Display: CELTS 15th Anniversary and Bonner Scholars 25th Anniversary

Hutchins Library is hosting a display by CELTS and the Bonner Scholars Program celebrating the 15th Anniversary of CELTS and the 25th Anniversary of the Bonner Scholars Program. The display is open to the public, and it can be viewed during regular library hours.

From the display’s statement:

“This photo reflection was inspired by two anniversaries – the 25th anniversary of the founding of the first Bonner Scholars Program in the nation at Berea College in 1990, and the founding of the Center for Excellence in Learning through Service (CELTS) in 2000. We hope that this photo display, curated by current CELTS labor students, inspires you to think about the ways that service is part of your Berea story.”

In addition, there is a guestbook available where you can tell us “How Service is Part of Your Berea Story?” Please feel free to share your service reflections in the guestbook.

NOTE: There will be a reception during Homecoming Weekend for this display. It will take place on Saturday, November 14, 2015 at 10am at Hutchins Library Main Floor.

CELTS 15th Anniversary Display 2015

Hutchins Library and the Campus Christian Center will turn a page of The Saint John’s Bible

SJB Gold_0From campus press release:

Hutchins Library and the Campus Christian Center will turn a page of The Saint John’s Bible each day of Pope Francis’ historic visit to America.

As a symbol of Christian unity and hospitality, we will join schools, churches, libraries and hospitals in “Illuminating the Mission: 7 Days – 7 Pages”

Beginning Monday, Sept. 21, and each day of Pope Francis’s historic visit to America, Hutchins Library will join institutions across the country by turning to the same page of The Saint John’s Bible.

This simple act will be a rich symbol of Christian solidarity as the American people welcome the Holy Father. There are over 160 illuminations and 1,150 pages in the seven volumes of The Saint John’s Bible.

The Library will display the following illuminations each day.

  • Monday, Sept. 21 Creation (Genesis)
  • Tuesday, Sept. 22 Abraham and Sarah (Genesis)
  • Wednesday, Sept. 23 Ten Commandments (Exodus)
  • Thursday, Sept. 24 Peter’s Confession (Matthew)
  • Friday, Sept. 25 Multiplication of the Loaves and Fishes (Mark)
  • Saturday, Sept. 26 Two Cures (Mark)
  • Sunday, Sept. 27 Pentecost (Acts of the Apostle)

According to Saint John’s Rev. Michael Patella, OSB, who chaired the scholarship effort behind The Saint John’s Bible, “These illuminations were specifically chosen because they resonate with values Pope Francis holds dear: hospitality; concern for the poor, sick and marginalized; the dignity of all people; and care for creation.”

In addition to the illuminated pages, a reflection for each day, written by Saint John’s University School of Theology and Seminary, will also be on display.

The Saint John’s Bible is the first handwritten and illuminated Bible commissioned by a Benedictine monastery since the invention of the printing press in the 15thcentury. Saint John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota, commissioned world-renowned calligrapher

Donald Jackson, senior scribe to Her Majesty the Queen’s Crown Office at the House of Lords in London, England, to create this masterpiece. More information on The Saint John’s Bible and the Heritage Edition can be found at http://www.saintjohnsbible.org.

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The library’s display can be found by the library’s entrance, near the Reference Desk. It can be viewed during regular library hours. This exhibit is free and open to the public.

St Johns Page Display_20150921

“What the St. John’s Bible Says to You” Library Display

In continuation of “A Year With the Saint John’s Bible”…

 MARCH MINDFULNESS

SJB Gold_0

St Johns Creation image

Creation, Covenant, Shekinah, Kingdom, Donald Jackson, Copyright 2006, The Saint John’s Bible, Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota USA. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

We would like to say “Thank you” to:

 

John King

Becky Lewis

Mark Ross

and Whitney Withington

 

for sharing “What the Saint John’s Bible Says to You.”

 

Now on Display in the Library Lobby

 

On Display: the Photographs of Alice Driver

Hutchins Library invites you to visit by an exhibit of Alice Driver’s photographic work that is now on display at the entrance of the Library.

The artist taking photographs

Alice Driver, at work

Alice Driver is a Berea College alum who will be presenting this evening, at Mundo Monday at 6pm, as well as at Peanut Butter and Gender this Wednesday the 25th at noon.

Alice’s book, More or Less Dead: Feminicide, Haunting, and the Ethics of Representation in Mexico, is being published by the University of Arizona Press next month. The library has ordered copies for its collection and will make them available as soon as possible.

The exhibit was curated by Rachel Burnside.

A Flyer about Alice Driver's Upcoming Presentation

A Flyer about Alice Driver’s Upcoming Presentation

International Berea

The next time you are in Hutchins Library, check out our newest display ‘International Berea’, located above the printers near the Educational Technology Help Desk.

International Berea
Reference student Megi Papiashvili curated the display and wrote the following piece on the history of International Students at Berea College:

International Education has been a very crucial part of Berea College’s history. “From its historical beginning as the first coeducational school in the South, Berea has been a pioneer in establishing an environment that fosters learning for, and about, all people of the earth.” Each year, the college accepts approximately 33 international students to help them develop the skills, knowledge, and attitudes needed for responsible participation in the global society. International students add diversity to this college, which also enriches the experience of other students on campus. By having such a strong global presence, Berea College students gain knowledge of world cultures; they examine the nature of cultural differences and national or regional conflicts and problems. All these help them understand the historical, cultural, and political relationships among different peoples which often reinforces their sense tolerance and empathy.

As other institutions of the college, Hutchins Library continues to be very welcoming towards international students. The current display on the main floor of the library is dedicated to celebrate the diversity at Berea College. The display provides information about the very first international student of Berea College, Noble Hill. He came from Canada in 1879, but because of interruptions due to his own and his father’s illness, his graduation was delayed until 1893. After his graduation from Berea he began teaching in Woodstock as a head-master of Todd School for Boys, a work he carried on for forty years. “I owe her [Berea’s early history] a debt I can never hope to repay.” Noble Hill, ’93

Berea College has played and continues to play an extremely important role in many international students’ lives, and William Gyude Moore is one of its successful (international) alumni. “Mr. Moore, a native of Maryland County, in the southeastern-most cape of Liberia, came to Berea College in 2002 to obtain his Bachelor’s degree. For the past two years, Moore has served as Deputy Chief of Staff/Head of the Program Delivery Unit in the Executive Office of the President of Liberia. From 2009 until 2012, he was Senior Aide in the Office of the President of Liberia. The president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has appointed him as one of her cabinet-level ministers. Moore will head his country’s Public Works Ministry which operates infrastructure programs with the largest allotment in the Liberian national budget.”

Berea College will continue to welcome students from different parts of the world, to help them succeed in their lives, and also to enrich the educational environment on campus.

We Have Zines!

The next time you are in Hutchins Library, you should stop by the periodicals section (near Circulation) and check out the zines currently residing at the end of our magazine/journal shelving.

What are zines? According to the St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture:

zines are nonprofessional, anti-commercial, small-circulation magazines produced, published, and distributed by their creators themselves. Composed and formatted on home computers, zines are reproduced on copiers or printers, assembled on kitchen tables, and sold or swapped through the mail or made available at small book or music stores. It is estimated that between 10,000 and 20,000 zines circulate in the United States and in other countries throughout the world. With names like Dishwasher, Temp Slave, Pathetic Life, Practical Anarchy, Punk Planet, and Slug & Lettuce, zines have a subject matter that ranges from the sublime to the ridiculous and sometimes the unfathomable. What binds these publications together is the prime directive “do-it-yourself.” Zines advocate that people stop shopping for culture and create their own (Duncombe 489).

To pique your interest, here is a sampling of just a few of the titles currently on display:

zine 4zine 3 zine 2 zine 1Our zines are not cataloged, so you won’t be able to search for them in BANC. Also, they are not a permanent part of our library collection. What does that mean to you? It means you need to come and enjoy them now, while they are here. Give yourself some time to browse the titles and be prepared to be shocked, educated, or entertained (or all three at once!)

Source:

Duncombe, Stephen. “Zines.” St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture. Ed. Thomas Riggs. 2nd ed. Vol. 5. Detroit: St. James Press, 2013. 489-490. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 7 Apr. 2014.